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The Bradley Dance Ac Group

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David Thomas
David Thomas

Mbti Career Test



This free career personality test uses Myers and Briggs' theory of 16 personality types, combined with the Holland Code system of career typing, to accurately measure the personality traits and interests that point to your ideal career path. See which jobs match your personality, strengths, and aptitude, and the key factors of your ideal career.




Mbti Career Test



A. When you complete the career test, you will first be shown a brief, free summary of your results and career recommendations. Then, you may choose to unlock your full report for a small fee. To see what you can expect from your full report, check out this career test sample report.


A. This personality test is based on Myers and Briggs' theory of sixteen personality types and is specifically designed to help you discover the right career for your type. Taking this career test is more accurate than simply looking at a list of jobs for your personality type because it measures your interests as well as your type, giving you a personalized list of careers that suit your unique profile.


A. No personality test is accurate for everyone, but this test has been researched extensively to ensure it is valid and reliable, using a variety of statistical methods. It is based on two of the most widely used and trusted theories in career planning: Myers and Briggs' system of personality typing, and psychologist John Holland's theory of career interest assessment.


If you're wondering which careers or majors appeal to you, then consider using the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator. This test uses scientifically-based insights to categorize personalities into 16 possible types and identify common behaviors. The end result means that you'll understand yourself a little better so you can make a career choice that best fits your personality.


Knowing your personality type, as measured through the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator instrument, can help you with career planning at every stage: from your choices of subjects and majors in school to choosing your first career, to advancing in your organization or changing careers later in life.


Although Myers graduated from Swarthmore College in 1919,[19] neither Myers nor Briggs was formally educated in the discipline of psychology, and both were self-taught in the field of psychometric testing.[20] Myers therefore apprenticed herself to Edward N. Hay, who was personnel manager for a large Philadelphia bank. From Hay, Myers learned rudimentary test construction, scoring, validation, and statistical methods.[21]


However, the use of type dynamics is disputed: in the conclusion of various studies on the subject of type dynamics, James H. Reynierse writes, "Type dynamics has persistent logical problems and is fundamentally based on a series of category mistakes; it provides, at best, a limited and incomplete account of type related phenomena"; and "type dynamics relies on anecdotal evidence, fails most efficacy tests, and does not fit the empirical facts". His studies gave the clear result that the descriptions and workings of type dynamics do not fit the real behavior of people. He suggests getting completely rid of type dynamics, because it does not help, but hinders understanding of personality. The presumed order of functions 1 to 4 did only occur in one out of 540 test results.[46]


Thinking and feeling are the decision-making (judging) functions. The thinking and feeling functions are both used to make rational decisions, based on the data received from their information-gathering functions (sensing or intuition). Those who prefer thinking tend to decide things from a more detached standpoint, measuring the decision by what seems reasonable, logical, causal, consistent, and matching a given set of rules. Those who prefer feeling tend to come to decisions by associating or empathizing with the situation, looking at it 'from the inside' and weighing the situation to achieve, on balance, the greatest harmony, consensus and fit, considering the needs of the people involved. Thinkers usually have trouble interacting with people who are inconsistent or illogical, and tend to give very direct feedback to others. They are concerned with the truth and view it as more important.[6]


Despite its popularity, it has been widely regarded as pseudoscience by the scientific community.[1][2][3] The validity (statistical validity and test validity) of the MBTI as a psychometric instrument has been the subject of much criticism. Media reports have called the test "pretty much meaningless",[61] and "one of the worst personality tests in existence",.[62] The psychologist Adam Grant is especially vocal against MBTI. He called it "the fad that won't die" in the Psychology Today article.[12] Psychometric specialist Robert Hogan wrote: "Most personality psychologists regard the MBTI as little more than an elaborate Chinese fortune cookie..."[63]


The test has been described as one of many self-discovery "fads"[12][13][15][66][67][68][69][70] and has been likened to horoscopes, as both rely on the Barnum effect, flattery, and confirmation bias, leading participants to personally identify with descriptions that are somewhat desirable, vague, and widely applicable.[68][71][72]


The content of the MBTI scales is problematic. In 1991, a National Academy of Sciences committee reviewed data from MBTI research studies and concluded that only the I-E scale has high correlations with comparable scales of other instruments and low correlations with instruments designed to assess different concepts, showing strong validity. In contrast, the S-N and T-F scales show relatively weak validity. The 1991 review committee concluded at the time there was "not sufficient, well-designed research to justify the use of the MBTI in career counseling programs".[78] This study based its measurement of validity on "criterion-related validity (i.e. does the MBTI predict specific outcomes related to interpersonal relations or career success/job performance?)."[78] The committee stressed the discrepancy between popularity of the MBTI and research results stating, "the popularity of this instrument in the absence of proven scientific worth is troublesome."[79] There is insufficient evidence to make claims about utility, particularly of the four letter type derived from a person's responses to the MBTI items.[13]


The main dimension in the MBTI is called E-I, or extraversion-introversion; this is mostly a sociability scale, correlating quite well with the MMPI social introversion scale (negatively) and the Eysenck Extraversion scale (positively).[90] Unfortunately, the scale also has a loading on neuroticism, which correlates with the introverted end. Thus introversion correlates roughly (i.e. averaging values for males and females) -.44 with dominance, +.37 with abasement, +.46 with counselling readiness, -.52 with self-confidence, -.36 with personal adjustment, and -.45 with empathy.[ii][iii] The failure of the scale to disentangle Introversion and Neuroticism (there is no scale for neurotic and other psychopathological attributes in the MBTI) is its worst feature, only equalled by the failure to use factor analysis in order to test the arrangement of items in the scale.[40]


The test-retest reliability of the MBTI tends to be low. Large numbers of people (between 39% and 76% of respondents) obtain different type classifications when retaking the indicator after only five weeks.[13][75][12] A 2013 Fortune Magazine article titled "Have we all been duped by the Myers-Briggs Test" wrote:


Within each dichotomy scale, as measured on Form G, about 83% of categorizations remain the same when people are retested within nine months and around 75% when retested after nine months. About 50% of people re-administered the MBTI within nine months remain the same overall type and 36% the same type after more than nine months.[93] For Form M (the most current form of the MBTI instrument), the MBTI Manual reports that these scores are higher.[94]


It has been argued that criticisms regarding the MBTI mostly come down to questions regarding the validity of its origins, not questions regarding the validity of the MBTI's usefulness.[96] Others argue that the MBTI can be a reliable measurement of personality, and "like all measures, the MBTI yields scores that are dependent on sample characteristics and testing conditions".[97]


Isabel Myers claimed that the proportion of different personality types varied by choice of career or course of study.[24][101] However, researchers examining the proportions of each type within varying professions report that the proportion of MBTI types within each occupation is close to that within a random sample of the population.[13] Some researchers have expressed reservations about the relevance of type to job satisfaction, as well as concerns about the potential misuse of the instrument in labeling people.[13][102]


At the time of the COVID-19 pandemic, MBTI testing became highly popular among young South Koreans who were using it in an attempt to find compatible dating partners. The craze led to a rise in MBTI-themed products including beers, music playlists and computer games.[118] One survey reported that by December 2021, nearly half of the population had taken the MBTI personality test. Also, the MBTI personality test became an issue in the presidential election.[119]


The MBTI assessment can transform how people work together. Only 14 percent of executives believe that the traditional model of a hierarchical organization is effective. Forward-looking leaders are moving to a flexible, team-focused model.* MBTI insights enhance personal development, supporting team and leadership training, conflict management, career change, and transitions. Multinational companies value the common language the Myers-Briggs assessment provides for discussing interpersonal differences, making it the preferred choice for training and development programs around the world. 041b061a72


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